I guess I’m lazy today. This post is almost exactly the same as the [see below] blog post was on Friday, August 2oth, 2010. And yes, that really is the color of the blog title and inspirational subhead. UPDATE: I had to change from royal blue to a more palatable color. 

A POEM A DAY FROM THE GEORGE HAIL LIBRARY ~ SELECTED BY MARIA HORVATH

(William Butler Yeats by John Singer Sargent, 1908

“A POEM SHOULD BE WORDLESS / AS THE FLIGHT OF BIRDS.” ~ ARCHIBALD MACLEISH (1892-1982), AMERICAN POET, FROM “ARS POETICA”

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“Sometimes I told myself very adventurous love-stories with myself for hero, and at other times I planned out a life of lonely austerity, and at other times mixed the ideals and planned a life of lonely austerity mitigated by periodical lapses,” W. B. Yeats wrote in his Autobiography. “I had still the ambition, formed in Sligo in my teens, of living in imitation of Thoreau on Innisfree, a little island in Lough Gill, and when walking through Fleet Street very homesick I heard a little tinkle of water and saw a fountain in a shop-window which balanced a little ball upon its jet, and began to remember lake water. From the sudden remembrance came my poem ‘Innisfree,’ my first lyric with anything in its rhythm of my own music.”

The Lake Isle of Innisfree

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,

And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:

Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honeybee,

And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,

Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;

 There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,

And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day

I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;

While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements gray,

I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet and dramatist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, 1923

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Incidentally, both Yeats and Sargent were featured artists in The Yellow Book, a leading British journal of the 1890s; to some degree associated with Aestheticism and Decadence, the magazine contained a wide range of literary and artistic genres, poetry, short stories, essays, book illustrations, portraits, and reproductions of paintings.

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