M. C. Escher meme, continued.  Escher and his new bride settled in Rome, where they lived from 1924 until 1935. They left because Escher deplored the fanaticism of Mussolini’s Italy, so they moved to Switzerland.

I’m guessing Escher sketched a roof-top statue for Rome and the Griffin of Borgheses, on (possibly) a Borghese family palace. Griffins are supposed to guard treasure and priceless possessions, but this griffin looks more like a dragon ready to scorch the city.

Rome and the Griffin of Borgheses, M. C. Escher, 1927

Rome and the Griffin of Borgheses, M. C. Escher, 1927

During those 11 years, Escher traveled throughout the Italian countryside each year drawing and sketching along the way. Scanning through his work chronologically (at WikiPaintings), it seems like every piece he created from 1928 – 1930 was a landscape. And they’re all fantastic!

I like the way my eye follows the sail boats from lower left to water’s edge at right; the dead branch continues the counter clockwise movement to the Citadel of Calvi Corsica.

Citadel of Calvi Corsica, M.C. Escher, 1928

Citadel of Calvi Corsica, M.C. Escher, 1928

Apart from being a graphic artist, Escher illustrated books, designed tapestries, postage stamps and murals. A set of illustrations from the 1931 horror book by Jan Walch, The Terrible Adventures of Scholastica (De vreeselijke avonturen van Scholastica), can be found here.

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NOTE: I don’t know why I published this post when I did. I’ve already edited twice, and it’s only been several hours since!

"Vignette", De vreeselijke avonturen van Scholastica 1931, illustrations by M.C. Escher

“Vignette”, De vreeselijke avonturen van Scholastica 1931, illustrations by M.C. Escher

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