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I started a new WordPress blog last week after I returned from New York. As of today, I have three posts on KargardeniaEclecticisms and Airy Nothings, all biographic memorabilia. Ooh. I like that. I don’t know where Kargardenia is going but I may change the subtitle to Biographic Memorabilia.

WordPress had a cute start-up page. It’s relevant here because it uses a partial quote from Act 5, Scene 1 of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream. You can read Theseus’s whole speech to Hippolyta below the Romani girl.

Cute start-up page…

You haven’t written anything yet, but that’s easy for you to do later! Here’s your chance to get your site looking just the way you want it to before the words start flowing. Some inspiration from someone who knew a thing or two about writing:

And as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen
Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.

– William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)

"Polish gypsy girl early 20th century" via Scarch

“Polish gypsy girl early 20th century” via Scarch

THESEUS

More strange than true. I never may believe
These antique fables nor these fairy toys.
Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
More than cool reason ever comprehends.
The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
Are of imagination all compact.
One sees more devils than vast hell can hold—
That is the madman. The lover, all as frantic,
Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt.
The poet’s eye, in fine frenzy rolling,
Doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven.
And as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen
Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.
Such tricks hath strong imagination,
That if it would but apprehend some joy,
It comprehends some bringer of that joy.
Or in the night, imagining some fear,
How easy is a bush supposed a bear!
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♠♠♠
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NOTE: Midsummer post inspired by Shakespeare. Photo inspired by Helen of Troy.
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