One hundred years ago today, Great Britain declared war on Germany beginning its involvement (militarily) in the Great War. The centennial is not necessarily arts history but its commemoration will be, especially for the Tower of London. 

Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red 5 August to 11 November 2014.

An evolving installation of 888,246 ceramic poppies by ceramic artist Paul Cummins, with setting by stage designer Tom Piper, will be unveiled on Aug 5, 2014. I don’t how many poppies are there now, but it will continue to grow throughout the summer until the moat is filled. Each poppy represents a British or Colonial military fatality during the war. The last poppy will be placed in the mote on Nov. 11th – Armistice Day.

Photographs courtesy of the Historic Royal Palaces

Photographs courtesy of the Historic Royal Palaces

Canadian physician Lt. Colonel John McCrae wrote In a Flanders Field to honor a friend who had fallen in the Second Battle of Ypres. The poem was published by Punch, a London-based magazine, in December 1915.  As a result of its immediate popularity, parts of the poem were used to recruit soldiers and raise money to sell war bonds. 

In a Flanders Field

John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

♠♠♠

More Breathtaking Photos via PetaPixel

Photographs courtesy of the Historic Royal Palaces

Photographs courtesy of the Historic Royal Palaces

 

The remembrance poppy is one of the world’s most recognized memorial symbols for soldiers who have died in conflict.

 

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