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Day 18 — National Blog-Posting Month. I am putting Lewis Carroll aside for a day (or two) but I’ll stay with photographs of children. I’ve featured early color photographs of children from National Geographic’s Found blog before. This one caught my eye because my family has seven siblings. Five sisters and two brothers. 

Seven siblings sit on a wooden fence in Quebec, Canada, May 1939.

Seven Siblings, PHOTOGRAPH BY HOWELL WALKER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Seven Siblings, PHOTOGRAPH BY HOWELL WALKER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

The color process is Autochrome Lumière: a glass plate coated on one side with a random mosaic of microscopic grains of potato starch. It was invented by the Lumière Brothers (Auguste and Louis) in Lyon, France 1902; patented and on the market in America by 1907. It was the principal color photography process in use before the advent of Kodachrome in the mid-1930s.

The Lumière brothers worked in their father’s photo firm, Louis as a physicist and Auguste as a manager, after they graduated from the largest technical school in Lyon. Louis made improvements to the still-photograph process, most notably the dry-plate process. After their father retired in 1892, the brothers began to create motion pictures. They patented a number of significant processes leading up to their film camera.

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The Lumière Brothers were the earliest film makers in history, holding their first private screening of projected motion pictures in 1895.

 

 

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